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Why Do We Celebrate The 4th Of July With Fireworks

Why Do We Celebrate The 4th Of July With Fireworks?

Last Updated on April 24, 2024 by Kimberlee Johnson

Every July, people across the United States look forward to a day brimming with festivities and patriotism.

Streets adorned with flags barbecue in full swing, and the night sky bursting with dazzling colors are the sights and sounds accompanying the grand celebration of the 4th of July. 

But why do we celebrate the 4th of July with fireworks? 

As a curious explorer of cultural customs, I embarked on a journey to unveil the captivating tale of why we honor Independence Day with the dazzling spectacle of fireworks that lights up our skies and warms our hearts.

Why Is The Fourth Of July Commemorated With Fireworks?

4th of July Fireworks

Celebrating the Fourth of July is a tribute to the thirteen colonies and a vibrant way to show the country’s longtime spirit of independence [1]. 

This tradition began when the colonies declared their freedom from British rule on July 4, 1777. People then took to the streets to mark the occasion with parades, bonfires, and cannons. 

Through the years, fireworks have become an integral symbol of our nation’s unity, liberty, and pride. 

Watching the colors brighten the night sky and hearing the loudness of explosions fill the air is an amazing reminder of the tremendous efforts of our forefathers and the true significance of independence.

Find out when the 4th of July fireworks in New York City start.

Who Proposed To Have Fireworks On The Fourth Of July?

The tradition of using fireworks to celebrate Independence Day originated with John Adams, one of the Founding Fathers, in 1776. 

“The important consequences to the American States from this Declaration of Independence, considered as the ground and foundation of a future government, naturally suggest the propriety of proclaiming it in such a manner as that the people may be universally informed of it.” 

John Hancock, Former President of the Continental Congress

In a letter to his wife Abigail, he suggested they mark the day with “Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations,” another name for fireworks. 

His idea of using fireworks to celebrate this momentous day has continued throughout the decades and is still a popular way to honor the date.

When Did Fireworks Become Part Of The 4th of July?

Fireworks have commemorated America’s independence since July 4, 1777. 

On that first Independence Day, fireworks lit up the sky in Philadelphia, ending a day of celebrations, according to the Pennsylvania Evening Post. 

Since then, fireworks have become closely associated with the Fourth of July in the United States. But where do you go to avoid the 4th of July fireworks?

What Do Fireworks Represent In America?

Photo of a Fireworks

Sparkling fireworks illuminate the night sky every Fourth of July, serving as a sign of the nation’s prosperity, patriotism, and enjoyment of freedom. 

Further, these displays symbolise American soldiers’ brave and selfless sacrifices during the Revolutionary War. 

Lastly, they represent the joy of unity and pride in the United States. All in all, fireworks are a magnificent symbol of celebration and triumph.

Check out these places you can go for the 4th of July weekend here.

What Transpired On The Fourth Of July, 1776?

On the Fourth of July in 1776, something remarkable happened in America. It was the day when the Second Continental Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence.

This important document, written mainly by Thomas Jefferson, declared that the colonies were breaking away from British rule and claiming their rights to life, freedom, and happiness. 

This event was the birth of the United States as an independent country. The signing of the Declaration wasn’t just a political act but a powerful symbol of defiance and a call for freedom.

It marked the start of the American Revolution, which changed history and inspired people for generations. 

What Prompted The Americans’ Desire For Independence?

Americans wanted independence because they felt the British authorities were trying to remove their freedom. 

“Fireworks illuminate the night, casting aside shadows of the past and illuminating the path towards a brighter, united future.”

Howkapow Gift Site

Most specifically, they were angered by the fact that they were being taxed heavily by the British government yet had no say in the decision-making process. 

This drove them to seek self-governance and the ability to make their laws and regulations. 

Further, restrictions were put on their trade and economic opportunities, diminishing their growth and prosperity; this further outraged the colonists. 

Also Read: What Time Was President Trump’s 4th Of July Parade?

FAQs

What colonists did not want freedom for America?

While many colonists supported the push for independence, a significant group, known as Loyalists or Tories, preferred to be subjects of the British Crown and didn’t want freedom for America. 

What are the two rights mentioned in the Declaration of Independence?

The Declaration of Independence mentions two fundamental rights: the right to life and the right to liberty. 

But when will be the 4th of July fireworks show in Chicago?

Wrapping Up

Fireworks are a vital and much-loved component of Fourth of July celebrations in the United States of America [2]. 

It is a tribute to the original thirteen colonies that fought for freedom and a powerful display of the nation’s unwavering spirit of independence. 

It is worth noting that the tradition of using fireworks to commemorate Independence Day can be traced back to John Adams, who envisioned the illuminations as a fitting way to mark the birth of a new nation in 1776. 

These awe-inspiring displays continue to captivate our imaginations, reminding us of the enduring values and freedoms we hold dear as Americans.

References:

  1. https://www.rd.com/list/declaration-of-independence-quiz/
  2. https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2020/03/06/56-most-amazing-things-about-america-today
Kimberlee Johnson
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